Dogs NSW celebrates the heritage, diversity and predictability of the purebred dog on National Purebred Dog Day

Purebred dogs have made vast contributions to society throughout history. They have served in a variety of working roles, often putting their lives on the line to protect, and provide companionship and many health benefits to people of all ages.

As the peak body for all purebred dogs in NSW, Dogs NSW celebrates these amazing and loyal companion animals on National Purebred Dog Day on May 1. 

“On this special day, we wish to highlight and celebrate the myriad of ways that purebred dogs enrich the lives of so many throughout society,” said Lynette Brown, President of Dogs NSW. 

Dogs NSW is the controlling body for all aspects and disciplines of purebred, pedigreed dog breeding and exhibitingin NSW, and is the member body of the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC). 

Purebred dogs work and provide an invaluable contribution as service, police and military dogs, as well as in conservation, search and rescue, hunting and herding, and more – and always, as companions and guardians of the family home. 

“What make purebred dogs unique are their purpose and predictability as to size, characteristics, temperament and appearance. This makes them the ideal family pets and wonderful working dogs that bring both assistance and comfort to mankind,” said Mrs Brown. “When considering a purebred dog, it is possible to narrow down the choices to those with attributes which most clearly fit into your personal lifestyle and interests.”

On National Purebred Dog Day, Dogs NSW also highlights and acknowledges the important role that responsible, ANKC-registered breeders of purebred dogs have in breeding healthy and sound canines. 

“Ethical breeders of purebred dogs are invested in the heritage of the breeds and dedicated to producing the next generation of healthy and sound canine citizens,” she said. “To help stamp out irresponsible breeding, prospective dog owners must educate themselves about the breed, any inherited diseases and recommended health testing for that breed. Potential owners should endeavor to work with responsible breeders to ensure they are getting the healthiest and most suitable dog for their lifestyle.”

Dogs NSW and Breed Clubs are available to assist the public locate ethical and credible breeders of healthy dogs. Dogs NSW also offers owners of registered purebreds a variety of activities and events to participate in and socialise with others of similar interests. 

Australia is home to about 200 pure breeds, more than 300 ANKC-affiliated breed and kennel clubs and 10,000 registered breeders throughout NSW. ANKC-registered breeders who abide by the Council’s breeding codes and guidelines carefully consider health issues, temperament and genetic screening, as well as individual care and placement of puppies in proper homes, said Mrs Brown.  

For more information, visit www.dogsnsw.org.au 

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